For Plumbing and Heating Engineers that like to go the extra mile

Here’s a little idea for Plumbing and Heating Engineers that like to go the extra mile.

Try this quick and easy way to pick up extra work without having to be the hard salesman. And your customers will love you for it!!

Click here to view the Valve Tags

Once you have marked up your customer’s isolation valves and stopcocks, your details will always be at hand for whenever they need to get in touch. Putting the valve tags on all the isolation valves and stopcocks means that in an emergency your customers will be able to quickly contact you and will be eternally grateful if you have talked them through what they need to do to avoid a disaster. But more importantly for you, you will be the first person they call when they are thinking of having any new work done.

Valve Tags for pipework and valves
Valve Tags for pipework and valves

We asked some members of the public if they thought this service would be useful and if it was something they would be prepared to pay for.

Here is what they had to say:

If you haven’t used these Valve Tags before, why not try the Valve Tag Special Offer for new customers and have your details printed on the tags for free!

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Gas Safety Superhero

Back in December 2016 we posted about the Gas Safety Superheroes and following on from this, we saw the article below in last month’s HVP about Peter Booth (@pbplumber on Twitter) who came up with the hashtag #regardthecard for the Gas Safety Superheroes campaign.

Gas Safety Superheroes

Here is HVP’s article on Peter:

A Good Influence

Peter Booth is a third-generation plumber, but the first in his family to explore a new side of plumbing through social media. Originally just tempted to pop a few pictures of his work online for other tradespeople to check out, Mr Booth was pulled in by the sense of community and the opportunity to get a look at the work of other plumbers, to see what they do differently and what equipment they use.

Now he had over 5,000 followers and his reach extends well beyond just a few photos of his installations.

Mr Booth is now involved in promoting gas safety to the wider industry, standing up for installers across the country and encouraging young people to get into the trades.

He said: “I remember when I hit 500 followers and I thought that was massive, and it’s just grown and grown. I always follow back if the person that follows me is in the trade, because I love seeing what other people are doing and I love interacting with other people. It’s like a big bunch of mates.”

Recently, he was impressed by the quality of work he saw from Den Hollingworth of Hollingworth Heating (@DenHollingworth on Twitter), and bought a bag of wire wool after seeing how good Mr Hollingworth’s pipework looked, in order to polish his own in the same way.

Mr Booth says social media is great for seeing the standard of other people’s work and improving your own as a result.

He said: “I normally only get to see my own work or, if I’m going to repair something, a job that may not have been done to a great standard.”

One of his main focuses recently has been working for the good of installers across the country, whether this is banding together to make opinions known about new schemes or opportunities, or to promote important work like his involvement in Gas Safety Superheroes, a not for profit campaign designed to improve awareness, training, energy efficiency and workmanship within the gas industry.

“Gas Safe Register do Gas Safety Week but, for us, it’s Gas Safety Year. It’s Gas Safety Day every day,” said Mr Booth.

“The part I came up with (for Gas Safety Superheroes) was the hashtag #regardthecard because, since I became Gas Safe registered 15 years ago, I can count on one hand the amount of times people have asked to see my card on jobs.”

“The biggest problem with gas is people doing it that aren’t qualified. If everyone is aware that they should ask for the card before they do any work then that’s got to be bad for the cowboys.”

Though Mr Booth is humble about his social media presence, he puts considerable effort into using it to represent other plumbers and draw attention to products and issues that he believes are important.

One such example was his use of Twitter to encourage manufacturers to implement a callback system for technical calls. After an overwhelming poll with 93% in favour, manufacturers including Viessmann and Baxi agreed to implement callbacks with immediate effect.

Taking Pride

Mr Booth said: “If you’re doing a good job and you’re proud of your work, then you should want to put it on a platform – be it Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. I think that’s how people are going to start getting more work, by how they advertise on social media.”

“A lot of it used to be word of mouth, but these days most people don’t talk to their neighbours, they just find everything online.”

“If you’ve got an online presence, that’s going to help you get your name around and get noticed.”

We wholly support Mr Booth’s commitment to improving the industry for

Personalised Landlord Homeowner Gas Safety Certificates
R M Labels Personalised Landlord Homeowner Gas Safety Certificates CP12

reputable installers.  At R M Labels we offer a range of products licensed by the Gas Safe Register that are only available to Gas Safe Registered engineers. Before supplying any products that contain the Gas Safe logo we always check the purchaser’s details match those registered with Gas Safe.

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Indoor Air Quality

BESA calls for air quality measures

It is reported that proposals for a new Clean Air Act should include Indoor Air Qualitymeasures supporting the role of buildings as a ‘safe haven’ from pollution, according to the Building Engineering Services Association (BESA).

“People spend more than 80% of their time indoors and there is still a lot more we can do to improve indoor air quality (IAQ)” says Chief Executive Paul McLaughlin. “A series of low cost maintenance measures to ensure ventilation systems work properly and incoming air is filtered and cleaned would make a major difference to the health and wellbeing of building occupants.”

BESA commissioned a YouGov survey last year that found almost 70% of office workers believed poor air quality in their place of work was having a negative impact on their day-to-day productivity and wellbeing. A third were also concerned that poor IAQ was damaging their health.

“Considerable investment has already been made in improving the airtightness of buildings to reduce energy consumption, and that same process can be used to manage air quality,” argues Paul McLaughlin

For more information: BESA IAQ Action Group

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Safe Electrical Isolation of Gas Appliances

 

Dont’t Ignore The Electrics

This article was spotted in the ‘Your Views’ section of HVP:

“The Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin (TB) 118 issued in July last year, quite rightly intimated that all engineers working on electrical appliances should be working under the Health & Safety at Work Regulations and more specifically the Electricity at Work Regulations.

This TB would appear to go some way in helping our industry take a safer approach to working on electrical appliances, or at least it would if it had reached more than a handful of engineers. Speaking to the gas engineers coming through our gas centre at Sterling Assessment Services on a daily basis, I can honestly say that all who were asked had no knowledge of this

Don't Ignore The ElectricsTB – and there lies the problem. I am sure that employers and engineers alike will have skipped over this TB due to its title and content: ‘Safe electrical isolation of gas appliances’.

In our experience, as an industry we have predominantly ignored: temporary continuity bonding, safe isolation of electrical appliances and basic fault finding practices. I will at this point apologise to those gas engineers/companies out there who do take this matter seriously, but in our experience you are in the minority. This approach can obviously lead to serious injury, or even death, along with possible prosecution and civil action against employers and employees who ignore legislation and manufacturers’ instructions.

A gas boiler is a 240V-AC electrical appliance with a large metallic surface area, along with numerous internal AC and DC electrical components, some of which can be as high as 325V-DC. With this in mind, surely it is inconceivable that engineers would proceed to put their hands in and around these appliances on a daily basis without first using basic electrical safety checks and the safe isolation procedures required by legislation and manufacturers’ instructions.

To this end, NICEIC has recently released a fully accreditied training and assessment program for gas engineers which guides them through basic electrical science, such as: safe isolation, how boilers/systems work and fault finding and testing. This will enable gas engineers and employers of gas engineers to keep up to date with the current electricity at work regulations while up-skilling themselves and their workforce on the fault finding techniques. This course will also allow gas engineers to use the latest up-to-date electrical testing equipment.” Julian Hearn, Sterling Assessment Services

Here is the Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin 118

NICEIC: Electrical Regulations Explained

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