Quick Solutions For Full Colour Banding For Pipework

We get lots of enquiries from customers looking for bespoke rolls of tape printed with full colour banding to the latest British Standard specification.  We are always happy to print made to order tapes, but for some customers this can be a costly option if they only need to mark up a small amount of pipework, as there is a minimum quantity of six rolls for the bespoke tapes. There is also the time factor involved when producing these tapes, which take around 10-14 working days to produce.

When you are short on time or only need to mark up a small amount of pipework, here are a couple of solutions…

Solution 1 – Pipe Banding

We have a range of individual self adhesive vinyl pipe banding strips that come in three standard widths, each piece is long enough to wrap around the pipework and any lagging, and it then sticks back onto itself – quick, secure and easy to apply!  The banding is printed on an high quality vinyl suitable for internal or external use.  For added protection the vinyl can also be over-laminated.  The banding strips are printed to the latest British Standard BS 1710:2014 full colour specification and comes complete with directional arrows and mirrored descriptive text that clearly identifies the pipe contents and can be seen and read from any direction.

Buy as many or a little as you need Pipe Banding Stripsfor the job: sizes 1 and 2 are sold in packs of 5 pieces, with the larger size 3 being sold in individual pieces, get a discounted price when you buy 4 or more packs (or for size 3 20 pieces), and further discounts are available for larger quantities.

We offer a quick turnaround on all pipe banding orders, including bespoke bandings, with most items being dispatched within 1-3 working days. All orders are dispatched using a next day courier service.

There is a full range of Pipe Banding for all the main services: water, gas, air, steam, acids & alkalis, electrical, waste effluents and oils, plus the option to create your own banding.

Download the Pipe Banding Information Sheet for more details on this product.

Solution 2 – Pipe Identification Tapes

Create your own full banding from our ranges of internal grade text, arrow and coloured tapes.  These are all kept in stock and are ready for immediate dispatch.  We have many of the basic British Standard Identification, Code and Safety colours available in 50mm, 100mm and 150mm widths, so that you can build the full colour banding to suit your pipework (don’t forget to allow for any lagging when working out the diameter of the pipework).

Here are some examples…

Example 1 – Full colour banding for pipework containing Drinking Water derived from the Public Water Supply

This example is suitable for drinking water pipework and any lagging up to 50mm in diameter with the water being derived from the public water supply. To conform to the latest BS 1710:2014 full banding requirements you would need a minimum banding width of 130mm (made up of 2 x 50mm Identification colour bands and a central Code colour of no less than 30mm); to achieve this you could use the following tapes:

Place the above tapes side by side around the pipework in the following sequence: Green Drinking Water/Auxiliary Blue/Green Arrows

This would give a 150mm wide band as shown below:

Pipe Identification Tapes Example 1

Example 2 – Full colour banding for pipework containing Lubricating Oil

This example is suitable for pipework and any lagging up to 100mm in diameter with the pipework containing lubricating oil. To conform to the latest BS 1710:2014 full banding requirements you would need a minimum banding width of 275mm (made up of 2 x 100mm Identification colour bands and a central Code colour of no less than 75mm); to achieve this you could use the following tapes:

Place the above tapes side by side around the pipework in the following sequence: Brown Lubricating Oil/Brown Arrows/Emerald Green/Brown Lubricating Oil/Brown Arrows

This would give a 300mm wide band as shown below:

Pipe Identification Tapes Example 2

Example 3 – Full colour banding for pipework containing Non Potable Water derived from Any Other Source

This example is suitable for pipework and any lagging in excess of 100mm in diameter, the water in the pipe is non potable and is derived from any other source (ie. the water does not come from the public water supply) . To conform to the latest BS 1710:2014 full banding requirements you would need a minimum banding width of 450mm (made up of 2 x 150mm Identification colour bands, plus the central Code and Safety colours with a combined width of no less than 150mm); to achieve this you could use the following tapes:

Place the first three tapes side by side around the pipework in the following sequence: Green/Flint Grey/Black/Flint Grey/ Green

Then add the Non Potable Water tape and the arrow tape over the centre of the outer green bands

This would give a 450mm wide band as shown below:

Pipe Identification Tapes Example 3

Choose from over 130 different 50mm wide descriptive text and directional tapes covering the following main services: water, gas, air, steam, acids & alkalis, medical gases and oils, plus there is the option to create your own pipe identification tapes.

Download the Pipe Identification Tapes Information Sheet for further details on these products.

The text, arrow and coloured tapes are all kept in stock for immediate dispatch using a next day courier service.

Alternatively, contact us for details of our bespoke internal and external tapes printed in full banding colours, including text and directional arrows.  The maximum width available is 275mm, with a minimum order quantity of six rolls per type.

If you would like advice on marking up your pipework please give us a call on 01348 840 675 or send us an email.

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Safe Electrical Isolation of Gas Appliances

 

Dont’t Ignore The Electrics

This article was spotted in the ‘Your Views’ section of HVP:

“The Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin (TB) 118 issued in July last year, quite rightly intimated that all engineers working on electrical appliances should be working under the Health & Safety at Work Regulations and more specifically the Electricity at Work Regulations.

This TB would appear to go some way in helping our industry take a safer approach to working on electrical appliances, or at least it would if it had reached more than a handful of engineers. Speaking to the gas engineers coming through our gas centre at Sterling Assessment Services on a daily basis, I can honestly say that all who were asked had no knowledge of this

Don't Ignore The ElectricsTB – and there lies the problem. I am sure that employers and engineers alike will have skipped over this TB due to its title and content: ‘Safe electrical isolation of gas appliances’.

In our experience, as an industry we have predominantly ignored: temporary continuity bonding, safe isolation of electrical appliances and basic fault finding practices. I will at this point apologise to those gas engineers/companies out there who do take this matter seriously, but in our experience you are in the minority. This approach can obviously lead to serious injury, or even death, along with possible prosecution and civil action against employers and employees who ignore legislation and manufacturers’ instructions.

A gas boiler is a 240V-AC electrical appliance with a large metallic surface area, along with numerous internal AC and DC electrical components, some of which can be as high as 325V-DC. With this in mind, surely it is inconceivable that engineers would proceed to put their hands in and around these appliances on a daily basis without first using basic electrical safety checks and the safe isolation procedures required by legislation and manufacturers’ instructions.

To this end, NICEIC has recently released a fully accreditied training and assessment program for gas engineers which guides them through basic electrical science, such as: safe isolation, how boilers/systems work and fault finding and testing. This will enable gas engineers and employers of gas engineers to keep up to date with the current electricity at work regulations while up-skilling themselves and their workforce on the fault finding techniques. This course will also allow gas engineers to use the latest up-to-date electrical testing equipment.” Julian Hearn, Sterling Assessment Services

Here is the Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin 118

NICEIC: Electrical Regulations Explained

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